Hi Brian

Wimbledon 2016 matches and with every shot I take I’m proudly supporting Malaria No More UK by sporting their logo on my sleeve.
 
During the seven years that I’ve backed the charity we’ve seen astonishing progress in tackling malaria.  Last year alone an estimated ¾ of a million children’s lives were saved thanks to the availability of diagnostic tests and drugs to treat the disease that cost just a few pounds.
 
Now that I am a father I am even more struck by the reality that a child still dies from malaria every two minutes.  But our generation has a real shot to end this disease in our lifetimes and I am determined to play my part
 
You can play your part too by helping communities become malaria free one person at a time.  £25 is enough to train a community health worker to swiftly diagnose and treat the children in their village when they fall sick.
 

 
 



Andy Murray
Malaria No More UK Leadership Council

We are in the process of updating the website content. There have been a few technical issues but these have now been resolved. Please revisit the site soon.

Thanks.

Visit REMaRAG in the Convention House of Friendship.

 

You will find us on stand 3139.

Please stop by and share some time with us.

Sumitomo Chemical Announces Breakthrough in the Development
of a New Mode of Action Insecticide for Adult Mosquito Control.

topsumvector
Only 4 classes of insecticide are currently recommended by the 'World Health Organization Pesticide Evaluation Scheme' (WHOPES) for indoor residual spraying (IRS). No new classes of insecticide for adult mosquito control have been introduced in the past 40 years. Since there is widespread and growing resistance to many of these compounds, especially in Sub Saharan Africa, malaria control programs have had very limited control options.
Sumitomo Chemical is therefore very pleased to announce the development and recent submission to WHOPES of a new mode of action insecticide product for adult mosquito control for application in IRS programs.

AFM produce regular newsletters. Here are some recent ones.

Mozambique, South Africa and Swaziland reports of their determination as well as a report titled "The World's First Malaria Vaccine Is Almost Here, and Will Be Entirely Not-For-Profit".

Link to document.

A collaboration between malaria research organisations and Myanmar's health ministry has made progress in combatting a drug-resistant strain of the disease, a study has found. For more details and the full story follow this link.

Regular monitoring will help to better interpret changes, identify determinants, modify strategies and improve targeting to address transmission says another report in the same issue. There is also an interesting piece about clumps or marine sedimend and the implication with antibiotic resistance.

South Africa is one of many countries committed to malaria elimination with a target of 2018 and all malaria-endemic provinces, including Mpumalanga, are increasing efforts towards this ambitious goal.

How to wipe malaria off the map! At a conference in Addis Ababa there was lots of discussion about how to finance the work done to eliminate malaria as well as the appropriate targets. Link to document.

Here's how to wipe malaria off the map
A goal properly set is halfway reached. So said the late Zig Ziglar, who knew a thing or two about lessons for success. Yesterday, not only was a goal set – to bring malaria deaths to near zero in the next 15 years – but we have a definitive plan that maps out what it will take to get us there. - See more at: http://www.fightingmalaria.org/news/2289.html#sthash.OxRC3FW2.dpuf
A goal properly set is halfway reached. So said the late Zig Ziglar, who knew a thing or two about lessons for success. Yesterday, not only was a goal set – to bring malaria deaths to near zero in the next 15 years – but we have a definitive plan that maps out what it will take to get us there. - See more at: http://www.fightingmalaria.org/news/2289.html#sthash.OxRC3FW2.dpuf

   Malaria 'spreading to new altitudes'.blq-blocks grey alpha

Warmer temperatures are causing malaria to spread to higher altitudes, a study suggests.

Researchers have found that people living in the highlands of Africa and South America are at an increased risk of catching the mosquito-borne disease during hotter years. They believe that temperature rises in the future could result in millions of additional cases in some areas.

The research is published in the journal Science.

Read more here.